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  1. there ain't none, however there are a set of big boys rules.... when taking other peoples tat over you either have to the product knowledge of how to over come any lock or quirks of the product or have enough £ in the job to put your own stuff in from either the start or retain the subscriber for enough years to make it pay.. confiture demain, as you might say ? Sadly a few hundred quid for new control can be a problem as the subscribers can be living had to month with the latest I-Phones, Range Rovers & shirt sponsoring the local professional sports team... taking priority
    4 points
  2. I'd give 'em a new system provide they have maintenance & out the yale tat on ebay or in the bin if don't sell...
    4 points
  3. if your panel has key switch input ? (I only remove 'em) - 5 - 32volt sonoff, However the correct advice is have something fit for propose. The people you annoy with your alarm(s) will have a local council have a website with similar advice - Noise pollution - Burglar alarms Burglar Alarms If you have a burglar alarm fitted to your home or business then by law you have a duty to ensure that it will not cause a nuisance to residents in the locality. eg prevents them from sleeping If this occurs, and the alarm is not turned off, then the council can take further action. If the Council is required to deal with an alarm causing a statutory nuisance, the owner will be asked to pay any costs incurred. There a number of steps you can take to ensure your alarm does not cause a nuisance. Ensure that any alarm fitted to your premises is properly designed. (The British Standard for intruder alarms is 4737 - your alarm should comply with this). Ensure that a legitimate alarm engineer, who will be able to set the sensors to the appropriate sensitivity, fits your alarm. This will prevent the alarm sounding unnecessarily. Ensure that an alarm engineer, ideally on a contract, maintains your alarm regularly so that you don't forget! Ensure that your alarm is fitted with a cut-off device to deactivate the siren or bell after 20 minutes. Ensure that at least one of your nominated key holders can respond within 20 minutes of being called out. What happens when the Council gets involved when an alarm causes a statutory nuisance? Once the Police are satisfied that there is no criminal activity taking place at the premises, and the Council is satisfied that the noise of the alarm is causing a statutory nuisance, then a legal notice will be served requiring the alarm to be silenced - normally within a short period of time. If this is not complied with then an application will be made to the Duty Magistrate for a warrant to enter the premises. The Council will engage the services of a locksmith and an electrician, and they will obtain access to the premises and disconnect the alarm. The Council will ensure that upon leaving, the premises is left in a secure condition. This whole process may take several hours. Who has to pay if an alarm has to be disconnected? The costs incurred by the council during this process will be recharged to the occupier of the premises. This can be expensive and will include the Council's costs, the costs of the locksmith and the electrician.
    3 points
  4. If the alarm is in good working order, having the power off a few hours wouldn't cause any issues. It's a common misconception that alarms sound if the mains goes off but that is actually a sign they are unmaintained and faulty. PA would likely activate if connected, so you would need the code before you can silence it. I assume any monitoring would be cancelled at this point but worth checking that too.
    3 points
  5. reading between the lines ? @al-yeti is implying its a piece of shit which belongs in a skip, you cheap skate....
    3 points
  6. Just asking? More than just asking dude ...... You mean like special brew ? Your favourite?
    3 points
  7. I don't like this attitude, condescending to rule out everybody else's opinion as childish because it doesn't align with your opinions. Maybe your not but it comes across that way. Remember most trade contributors have decades of experience screwing boxes of electronics to walls with some effort of providing security and detection. If this is the type of answer you are looking for then it's a different topic of conversation about the industry as a whole, it's a massive bag of worms difficult to put in one post... You contradict yourself in the same post, your not in the industry but they replied to your support ticket. I'm not surprised BTW. I don't think any company can truly ignore a request for support it just looks bad, this is where they have to strike some balance and were installers would prefer they at least had priority. It's always been the same anyone can get hold of any kit, I don't feel you can withhold basic support in this instance. Just like with any other products not in the industry. The issue is you can't teach someone how to fit a "pro" alarm system via a support ticket or a forum, engineers have had years of training or apprenticeships to understand how it all fits together and apply it. This is were prosumer or DIY falls apart IMO, it's not just about the product it's about the knowledge and application of it. The "pro" gear has also had years of tweaks, specifically for the UK market to make it adaptable for every installation and engineers are trained and get support on it. You can't condense years of installer knowledge on security into a prosumer product or make a DIY install manual. The grading thing your asking about is sort of irrelevant for this instance, you can only fit a graded system as a company. It's the whole fitted system that "becomes graded", the component parts of the system have to conform but the system is graded as a whole. So outside of the industry it means very little unless you understand what each grade means and have knowledge of each standard that parts correspond to. We also have different variations on top of the EN standard in the UK too, we refer back to BS4743 and then we have BS8243 as some examples. The other points Al alluded to is who tested the kit conformed? Has it had third party testing for the UK market? At best it's unproven along side established products. The UK market is very different and why I believe lot of this "tat" is pitched as prosumer/DIY were I could see a company fitting it in the rest of the EU. It's also pointless to try and break into a market that has plenty of options with a new product that does similar to what your engineers are trained on. Also any product could claim it's two way but only have one component two way (cough, powermax tat) this is where marketing comes in. Unless you understand how this type of kit functions in a activation, what the spec sheet or marketing says means very little.
    3 points
  8. Sorry don't get excited, I don't recall working on one either, but just a word of caution I suppose. You have to consider it's a life safety system, its one thing fumbling though programming on intruder worst case in most instances if something was wrong would be a fail to operate and possibly damage or stolen items, not advised but it's not life. It depends on if you are just providing operational checks or if your expected to repair faults and re-commissioning, you would only need Level 2 access for the former. I know you didn't put yourself in this position when sales want to takeover any old tat but it is worth mentioning to them it's kit that none of the engineers know how to use properly, if something needs adjusting. Your right not everyone knows everything about every piece of kit but this is why companies have a list of preferred kit, try to stick to it and train there engineers on it. Leaves less to go wrong.
    3 points
  9. Not a Veritas it's Gardtec and means line fault.
    2 points
  10. A 13a plug top
    2 points
  11. Soak test is used for testing a circuit, for example a detector activates and you see no environmental reasons for the activation, you can put the circuit on soak. It will log activations but it wont alarm. So when you return check the log if it hasnt activated you can take it off soak
    2 points
  12. soak test - an intruder alarm zone will not generate an alarm for the duration of the soak test just log' display it as a fault eg- you've a warehouse with DT900 it false alarms... you've checked the cables & the voltages blah, blah.... you reckon it might be the detector or it might be the vermin you pop a new detector on & place it on 14 day soak test, if does not FA in the next 14 days it becomes a intruder zone on the system again with no more action to take if it fails the soak test "soak failure" will be on the display & when the alarm FA'd in the middle of the night nobody got called out...
    2 points
  13. HKC have a wireless Dualtech now its much better for hostile environments like sheds and garages
    2 points
  14. I change all batteries every 2 years. Panasonic or duracell meaningless see attached graph showing discharge curve. They run then once they start to drop are dead within 1 - 2 weeks see above Yes, as you say the device should poll every x seconds or minutes (depends on brand) some stuff can be hours! Once it hasnt recieved them over period x then the panel reports supervision failure
    2 points
  15. Bargain and at least you now know its sorted.
    2 points
  16. Agreed a fuse is their to protect the control panel, they dont blow because the there is something wrong with the control panel.
    2 points
  17. On the plus side for the health and safety of the nation, not just our industry, H doesn't look at vetting just yet
    2 points
  18. my zone is linked out....
    2 points
  19. We get so many of these and always the op is convinced that its the alarm, I remember as an engineer telling a customer over the phone it was a low battery on their smoke, they insisted I come out. £70.00 plus VAT (it was the early 90's) callout later, I found an old smoke detector in a kitchen drawer with the battery still in it. Its like we tell them what it is and the dont believe us
    2 points
  20. I'd suggest you power it all down then find out it's a battery operated bit of junk, nest smoke, other smoke detector then I'd look for alarm clocks birthday cards etc. A powered down alarm is just that.
    2 points
  21. If I was a betting man- I'd wager you've more chance of getting a hand job off her majesty the queen than your powered down alarm making the "chirp" You've probably got a brand new in box, carbon monoxide or smoke alarm in the cupboard....
    2 points
  22. Check your drawers for an old smoke detector
    2 points
  23. I would not dare issue one to an employee, The odd time I used a telescopic ladder I'm shaking like a shitting dog.... & I've use the #palletofdoom
    2 points
  24. Calm down grandad, you're arguing with yourself again.
    2 points
  25. 2 points
  26. shock sensors have a 1st to latch, in these primitive pre mobile phone days... alarm men used to drill a little hole in the cabinet & fit a push to break switch which removed power to the vipers making them reset.... I recommend getting a proper alarm co. to fit a proper alarm
    2 points
  27. But it doesn't use that method does it? You making this all up? I knew you were a blagger
    2 points
  28. agreed but the market demands this doorbell height nickable tech. Ive already been asked to use the alarm to protect it after its nicked. Issue I have is that people think its better than an IAS then the low level 'security system' is stolen before it can upload anything now its the IAS problem to solve. Just have decent cctv that doesnt wait till the perp presses a button (that has to be in easy reach) or just have a door bell. Few nicked the old friedland bell push
    2 points
  29. Ebay it, for cash spend cash on drink and slappers ?
    2 points
  30. It is a WW2 filter bunker in Inverness. 2 underground levels and about 50 rooms. It was used 24x7 during WW2, and hardended in the 90s (full NBC double air-locks etc) to allow high heid yins to hide until all the carnage of a nuke strike was over. 2 x 6 cylinder perkins engines driving 3-phase generators INSIDE the building - with their own air supply and separate air-locks (since the air was not filtered to NBC level) to keep the building running after the EMP. Bikes to keep the air circulating in the event of the power and the generators all failing! It served me well during covid Anyway it is now alarmed up. Link to some info about the bunker
    2 points
  31. You could flash the software , but unlikely your going to be able to do it yourself I assume panel was cheap, and what your protecting isn't worth much?
    2 points
  32. Most do disable the option imo. Nearly all the systems I have taken over have the option disabled. I find it a real pain when enabled with the usual response ‘we only have a fob no code’
    2 points
  33. intruder alarms ? I'd advise any self employed electrician to make friends with a tame alarm monkey... aka - let some other mug deal with the hassle Its mostly coloured wires & product knowledge, you can do a b-tec or train with tavcom or similar If your foolish enough to want t be an alarm man just apply for job at the biggest co. you can find,
    2 points
  34. Just want to wish all a happy a prosperous New year.
    2 points
  35. I'm looking forward to covid 20 !
    2 points
  36. System was designed as such it required that sensor , so why would t you get it fixed? It's possible of course to disable any sensor , but at what point would you stop disabling sensors ? Useful is as above , get someone to look at it , but if house , or valuables or yourself is not worth protecting anyway , rip it out and turn it off is probably best (not)
    2 points
  37. I am all for keeping serviceable well maintained systems irrelevant of age. From the pictures I wouldn't be wasting time on that mess and want to be upgrading it. You can't expect a cheap domestic onboard panel to work in a dusty/dirty environment for very long. It also appears to have been lacking any maintenance with one of those batteries in and what's with the two woodscrews holding the transformer in...
    2 points
  38. Panel in the roofspace... F*ck roofspace lol
    2 points
  39. Don't.... you need to spend some time working at a proper co.
    2 points
  40. I converted to security about 6 years ago after being a sparks... I do prefer it but best advice I can give you is make sure you learn as much as you can from your colleagues as the information isn't as widely available on the Internet as it is for sparks. If it's just intruder alarms then there's not much to worry about but it does get complicated if you need to integrate it with CCTV and access control etc on a large commercial. As for what's the best intruder alarm... There isn't one. If you asked 5 different alarm engineers what the best panel is they will name 5 different brands. Alarm engineers tend to fit the brands that they are experienced in and know inside out. The actual concept of an alarm is the same amongst all the brands but they all have their own menu setups and characteristics.
    2 points
  41. Some helpful advise if you see a paragon panel rip it off the wall and stamp on it immediately
    2 points
  42. No man You should tell customer you cant help and if he doesn't upgrade the panel from you he will end up getting someone else to do the same thing And walk away ?
    2 points
  43. Seems I was right. Something clearly doesn't add up here, good luck with whatever this thread was suppose to achieve.
    2 points
  44. Can't get it to work help?
    2 points
  45. I was doing a job in Netherton in Dudley last year where the homeowner had passed away and the family wanted the building securing. I opened an airing cupboard and there in front of me on top of a blanket was an immaculately preserved WW2 Mills grenade. I had seen enough of them during my time at Warminster to know that this one looked very real. One visit from EOD and one controlled explosion in Netherton Park later confirmed that it was indeed very real and then it was back to work. I was especially careful as to where I worked on anything in that house after that.
    2 points
  46. Hopefully, you're not powering up without a keypad. If you do that, then you cannot use the correct process to power down (menu 51.17-power off) and wait until the keypad shows 'Safe to power off'. With Flex, if you just pull the power, you have a small chance that you will corrupt the flash filesystem, leaving the panel bricked.
    2 points
  47. the self employed aerial man, appears to be leading supplier of cctv wiring cable tied to fall pipes
    2 points
  48. Professional Lol. Modern Micromark.
    2 points
  49. Now your a "furry" you can only collect pet friendlily stuff..
    2 points
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