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GalaxyGuy

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GalaxyGuy last won the day on April 23 2019

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About GalaxyGuy

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    http://www.sm-alarms.co.uk

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    Embedded Design, Security System Design, Etc.

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  1. More around £30 to £40 now. I've had a few come to me to buy the -08 / -10 after their -04 eBay purchase has failed after a few months. Too late for any comeback on eBay, so they just accept the lesson learned and part with the money to get their system working again.
  2. Yes, some network misconfiguration can also crash the panel (I've had a couple of customers who have experienced that), but low risk compared to the CPU going pop. The board is scrap once this happens. If you have an older module and it works, then it may keep doing so. The longer they lie on the shelf without power makes it more likely to fail. I wouldn't sell the older boards now, as they're just a headache.
  3. Yes, an E080, but buy an E080-08 or an E080-10. The older models have a bug that allows a syn-flood to crash the panel. The E080-4 and A083-00-01 modules use an obsolete Texas Instruments CPU that has a burnout problem. You'll get an old used E080-4 on Ebay for around £30, but it may not last for long before it dies. The E080-08 and E080-10 are based on a new CPU design that doesn't have any of those issues.
  4. It makes sense to publish from a common source rather than file shares on facebook.
  5. Not much to be gained from the firmware files unless the design is secured by obscurity. Oh, wait... Seriously though, it would be pretty hard to keep these things out of the public domain these days. The touch screen displays are a bit of an expensive gimmick anyway. And why would you want to look at CCTV cameras on an alarm keypad in a hallway Etc. when you can do the same on your phone. Someone on one of the Facebook forums posted a pic of a new Honeywell commercial security range. I cannot remember the name, but it looked quite different to any of the Galaxy products of yesteryear.
  6. Yes, Honeywell now post some firmware releases to: https://www.security.honeywell.com/uk/resources/technical-support/software-upgrades/galaxy-software-download-centre No support if you brick your devices though.
  7. OP, you will need to place the latest English touch center firmware on a FAT32 formatted SD card, then insert the card into the CP045 and power on. The touch enter will then re-flash its firmware and default. You should have received an SD card and firmware with the new touch center. If you are a Selfmon customer, contact me via the Selfmon email for support. If not, then contact your installer.
  8. Apps are fairly easy to overcome though, so you're relying on your employees at the end of the day.
  9. Either way will work. The Galaxy GX app will provide free push notifications. Selfmon enables granular control for different push/sms/email/voice messages to different devices/people along with line path monitoring and ddns.
  10. You wouldn't normally need to open anything for outbound traffic. Not on a home router anyway and not port forwarding, as that's for routing incoming traffic. Ie. For the app connecting back to your panel when you're not on your home network. Ensure the panel gateway address (your router internal IP address) and the panel netmask in the panel menu 56.4 are correct.
  11. Yes, indeed. In the context of the original question, the point is moot, as both AC and DC can cause interference with the 'circuit' signal. In the case of the differential pair of the RS485 bus, this is less of an issue, as it's the differential that's important and as both wires are impacted by the same external noise, the data signal isn't impacted. The problem usually comes with mains based signals where heavy currents drawn by mains based appliances can cause huge induced voltages in nearby cables, that can damage the bus drivers and the analog to digital multiplexers that read zone voltages. The actual zone voltages can also be disturbed, causing nasty false alarms that can be really difficult to diagnose. I'm not sure if there's enough current driving the alarm speaker to cause any issue, but if the manufacturer advises against it, then it's probably based on some measurement or experience of a problem in the past. Yes.
  12. So, how does the current change direction on an output that can only switch from +12v DC to 0v ? Ah, I see that you've changed to "generally ac" now.
  13. What's your definition of audio? A speaker makes a noise because the diaphragm is driven in and out by the voice coil. An AC signal will drive the speaker coil in both directions rapidly at various changing frequency, thus giving audible sound. By just switching the diaphragm between one direction and rest, at various frequency, as in pulsed DC, you will also generate audible sound.
  14. What's your definition of audio? A speaker makes a noise because the diaphragm is driven in and out by the voice coil. An AC signal will drive the speaker coil in both directions rapidly at various changing frequency, thus giving audible sound. By just switching the diaphragm between one direction and rest, at various frequency, as in pulsed DC, you will also generate audible sound.
  15. This all depends on the panel circuit. Where a panel circuit is dedicated to a speaker connection, the design may be AC driven. Where it's a regular transistor based open collector output, with the option of being configured for regular or speaker output (like in the Galaxy G2 or Flex), the output is pulsed DC when in speaker mode. Pulsed DC isn't AC.
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