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Paul Main

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About Paul Main

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  • Website URL
    http://www.clearview-cctv.co.uk

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  • Gender
    Male

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  • Location
    Chelmsfod Essex United Kingdom
  1. Please pm me on see contact below and I'll get some samples over to you
  2. You might be interested to hear that my company (ClearView Communications) has developed an "anyformat player" which decodes all analogue multiplex tape formats and most digital CCTV formats. We're up to around 450 codecs so far. The system auto-detects the appropriate format for viewing. It also corrects some of the poorer manufacturers players by (for example retrieving the time/date from the metadata and putting it back into the video picture). We've developed a single player interface for replaying different CCTV formats. The product is primarily used by police forces to simplify CCTV replay.
  3. I agree with last response. The DVR is set to record at highest resolution setting (likely to be 4CIF). This records two fields, one 1/50 sec after the other, and then shows them as a combined single image. If the recording resolution is set to less than the maximum (may be specified as 2CIF or a lower pixel res), the DVR will record only one filed. In theory, this reduces the resolution of the picture, but in practice makes it easier to see moving objects.
  4. Another option is to record using a Hi-Fi VHS VCR which will record 2 audio channels (left + right) onto 1 video tape. Soem high end dVRs will record 4 channels of audio with 4 video channels, but these tend to be top end
  5. Never had the need for 3D CCTV CAD myself, but these guys do something......... http://cctvcad.com/index.html
  6. Quadrox network video recorders accept direct IP inputs from a range of IP cameras (Panasonic/Axis/Sony etc.). Several other manufacturers support a mix of analog and IP inputs. Most manufacturers offer a single RJ45 input, multiple cameras are input via a standard hub. Inputs are not limited like traditional DVRs with BNC connectors. The limitation on IP camera inputs is defined by the processing power of the recorder (often max of around 10 - although some manufacturers state up up 32). Link: http://www.webcctv.com/start.asp?main=webcctv_nvr
  7. I'd also recommend wireless IP. This will also work well if you need to receive and record 3 cameras at single receiving location.
  8. Very impressive site. Best selection of cctv photos I've seen on the web yet. Well done - keep it up!!
  9. You will get a "port hole" effect where the image captured by the 1/3 inch lens dosn't cover the whole of the 1/2 inch CCD chip e.g. a black area around the edge of the TV screen.
  10. ClearView Communications Ltd Robjohns Road Chelmsford Essex CM1 3AG Tel: 01245 214104 Fax: 01245 214101 paul.main@clearview-cctv.com www.clearview-cctv.co.uk Types of work undertaken: CCTV, access control and integrated systems. Wired and wireless IP. Governing Body: BSIA ISO9001/2000
  11. The focal length of the lens needs to be cosen to give the angle of view required. Generally, a shop isle will require a narrower lens than the 3.6mm one mentioned which will generally give a widish angle view. Most dome suppliers offer a range of lens focal lengths - or for a bit of extra cash -vari-focal lenses which can be set on site.
  12. The following might be worth a look http://ws.textanywhere.net/web/Products/
  13. My recommendation would be to migrate from analog to digotal recording initially. Your analog cameras can be connected to new DVRs with Honeywel camera control compatibility. The new DVRs will have IP connectivity so that can be viewed at the recorder location or anywhere on your network (with authorisation). I do not necesssarily see immediate benefits of changing analog to IP cameras since perforamce of analog front end devices is very often better than newer IP models.
  14. My suggestions, to keep quality up and costs down are to use a high res colour camera (suggest JVC or Sanyo) with zoom lens (suggest Videor Technical) (max resolutions without going to broadcast spec are 480 to 520 TV lines). Many colour cameras on the market meet this spec. This could be mouted on an internal pan/tilt head (recommend Vicon APT3030) which can be controlled from a hardwired joystick controller (suggest Nortek). Control cable is a 12-core multicore. If you use a camera with a Y/C SVHS output, this could connect into the Y/C input of your DVD recorder. I know that everyone's into domes these days and they are more aesthetically pleasing - but you will pay extra for these. If you're happy you have the technical nouse to install the kit - fine. Otherwise, employ a CCTV technician who could have the system installed and working in a few hours. Cost of camera, lens, PT head and controller will be within your 2k budget.
  15. My suggestions, to keep quality up and costs down are to use a high res colour camera (suggest JVC or Sanyo) with zoom lens (suggest Videor Technical) (max resolutions without going to broadcast spec are 480 to 520 TV lines). Many colour cameras on the market meet this spec. This could be mouted on an internal pan/tilt head (recommend Vicon APT3030) which can be controlled from a hardwired joystick controller (suggest Nortek). Control cable is a 12-core multicore. If you use a camera with a Y/C SVHS output, this could connect into the Y/C input of your DVD recorder. I know that everyone's into domes these days and they are more aesthetically pleasing - but you will pay extra for these. If you're happy you have the technical nouse to install the kit - fine. Otherwise, employ a CCTV technician who could have the system installed and working in a few hours.
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