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Maria Gill

Risco eurosec CPX wireless alarm system

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Your all assuming she's correct and engineers isn't .

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34 minutes ago, al-yeti said:

Your all assuming she's correct and engineers isn't .

We're not,  we are seeing it from both sides hopefully. If a customer telephone here complaining we would first off ask them to put their grievance in writing. It would come to me and I would investigate it, I would look at the job sheet, then speak with the operation manager, then speak with the engineer. If the failed product was still in our quarantine shelf I would look at the item. I will then call the customer and get their side. Once I have all the facts I will make judgement. As far as I can make out in the problem started when there was power problems no mains. When the power returned, it was discovered that all the batteries in the detection required changing and the main control panel battery was fine. I can only surmise from experience what had happened, but you and I both know that it is likely that the power needed recycling on the CPU. What we dont know is what the panel did/said once it came back to life. It could be sour grapes on part of the alarm company because the customer did not have the system serviced, reading the information claimed to be on the invoice I can understand why Maria would think that. Or it could be that the Lithium batteries were genuinely failing. The problem now is that the Maria suspects its sour grapes, so therefore is asking us if her suspicion could be correct. We dont know for sure as we have only heard her half of the story, but it is possible, and that is all I am saying. The inspectorate will find out by asking the company the right questions. 

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4 hours ago, Maria Gill said:

I  Gave a full explanation to three people over the phone explaining what had happened to cause the power outage prior to the engineer calling. He actually left all of the 'dead' batteries he had replaced as well as the rubbish from the new ones and when I dropped them none of them bounced. Thank you very much Peter 

LOL drop testing is using a special instrument that puts a load onto the battery, but as Paul says below, you cannot do this with Lithium batteries.

4 hours ago, sixwheeledbeast said:

Drop testing lithium batteries is a bad idea they could explode, and also doesn't indicate charge like a alkaline would.

You could only test them with a multimeter and that would only give you an indication as they are not loaded.

 

 

 

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28 minutes ago, PeterJames said:

We're not,  we are seeing it from both sides hopefully. If a customer telephone here complaining we would first off ask them to put their grievance in writing. It would come to me and I would investigate it, I would look at the job sheet, then speak with the operation manager, then speak with the engineer. If the failed product was still in our quarantine shelf I would look at the item. I will then call the customer and get their side. Once I have all the facts I will make judgement. As far as I can make out in the problem started when there was power problems no mains. When the power returned, it was discovered that all the batteries in the detection required changing and the main control panel battery was fine. I can only surmise from experience what had happened, but you and I both know that it is likely that the power needed recycling on the CPU. What we dont know is what the panel did/said once it came back to life. It could be sour grapes on part of the alarm company because the customer did not have the system serviced, reading the information claimed to be on the invoice I can understand why Maria would think that. Or it could be that the Lithium batteries were genuinely failing. The problem now is that the Maria suspects its sour grapes, so therefore is asking us if her suspicion could be correct. We dont know for sure as we have only heard her half of the story, but it is possible, and that is all I am saying. The inspectorate will find out by asking the company the right questions. 

Yes no paper work provided here details.can be omitted , but avoided 

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2 hours ago, al-yeti said:

Your all assuming she's correct and engineers isn't .

There is nothing to assume. I have simply stated the facts of what happened and raised a genuine query so it's not a matter of anyone assuming I am correct. I am suggesting that the outage caused issues with the alarm and seeking a response to that. I don't understand what anyone would be assuming I'm correct about. I am not an expert so I have no idea. 

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2 hours ago, al-yeti said:

Your all assuming she's correct and engineers isn't .

I'm not 

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Nothing is foolproof to a sufficiently talented fool.


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1 minute ago, norman said:

I'm not 

I should have known your lurking about

 

Doh!

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@Maria Gill is this the same company who installed the system originally? 


Nothing is foolproof to a sufficiently talented fool.


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What was your criteria for choosing them? 


Nothing is foolproof to a sufficiently talented fool.


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13 minutes ago, norman said:

What was your criteria for choosing them? 

They were recommended by someone who had used them 10 years ago and they were local

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I don't know these panels, But why can't you scroll back through the event log to see whats it shows prior to power outage and when the engineer arrives.

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There is nothing coincidental about this... The power cut required the panel to be reset with an engineer code (if you had this code you could do it yourself in seconds for free but this is how alarm companies make their income). Additionally you could replace the batteries yourself for around £2 per battery but again the engineer code is required because any change requires an engineer reset. The call out charge by this company is far too cheap but it is clear they offset this by putting a markup on the batteries. By your own admission, you use the alarm whilst at home as well as when away meaning the alarm is in regular use which will deplete the batteries more quickly - typically even a good battery only gives about a year or reliable service. Seems clear to me that the engineer had to come out as the alarm required resetting (which he didn’t charge you for unless they include basic resets within the call out charge) and whilst there advised that batteries needed replacing which is plausible considering they were 21 months old with fairly heavy use. The batteries may all have been ‘low’ rather than dead taking away the ‘coincidence’ surrounding them failing at the same time as the power cut. Either way, the reason you called the engineer was because the alarm needed reset and at the very least I would be expecting the builder to pay the call out charge. The batteries however needed replaced and will need replaced annually to ensure reliability...

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13 minutes ago, Rory Risco said:

There is nothing coincidental about this... The power cut required the panel to be reset with an engineer code (if you had this code you could do it yourself in seconds for free but this is how alarm companies make their income). Additionally you could replace the batteries yourself for around £2 per battery but again the engineer code is required because any change requires an engineer reset. The call out charge by this company is far too cheap but it is clear they offset this by putting a markup on the batteries. By your own admission, you use the alarm whilst at home as well as when away meaning the alarm is in regular use which will deplete the batteries more quickly - typically even a good battery only gives about a year or reliable service. Seems clear to me that the engineer had to come out as the alarm required resetting (which he didn’t charge you for unless they include basic resets within the call out charge) and whilst there advised that batteries needed replacing which is plausible considering they were 21 months old with fairly heavy use. The batteries may all have been ‘low’ rather than dead taking away the ‘coincidence’ surrounding them failing at the same time as the power cut. Either way, the reason you called the engineer was because the alarm needed reset and at the very least I would be expecting the builder to pay the call out charge. The batteries however needed replaced and will need replaced annually to ensure reliability...

 

 do you do alarms for living ?


Mr:)

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17 minutes ago, Rory Risco said:

There is nothing coincidental about this... The power cut required the panel to be reset with an engineer code (if you had this code you could do it yourself in seconds for free but this is how alarm companies make their income). Additionally you could replace the batteries yourself for around £2 per battery but again the engineer code is required because any change requires an engineer reset. The call out charge by this company is far too cheap but it is clear they offset this by putting a markup on the batteries. By your own admission, you use the alarm whilst at home as well as when away meaning the alarm is in regular use which will deplete the batteries more quickly - typically even a good battery only gives about a year or reliable service. Seems clear to me that the engineer had to come out as the alarm required resetting (which he didn’t charge you for unless they include basic resets within the call out charge) and whilst there advised that batteries needed replacing which is plausible considering they were 21 months old with fairly heavy use. The batteries may all have been ‘low’ rather than dead taking away the ‘coincidence’ surrounding them failing at the same time as the power cut. Either way, the reason you called the engineer was because the alarm needed reset and at the very least I would be expecting the builder to pay the call out charge. The batteries however needed replaced and will need replaced annually to ensure reliability...

Rubbish batteries last 3years average on good systems 

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6 minutes ago, MrHappy said:

 

 do you do alarms for living ?


Yes

5 minutes ago, al-yeti said:

Rubbish batteries last 3years average on good systems 


Not in my experience, particularly with Risco equipment. Once batteries register ‘low’ on the control panel the system won’t allow you to set it without first omitting it as a fault... 

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6 hours ago, Rory Risco said:

There is nothing coincidental about this... The power cut required the panel to be reset with an engineer code (if you had this code you could do it yourself in seconds for free but this is how alarm companies make their income). Additionally you could replace the batteries yourself for around £2 per battery but again the engineer code is required because any change requires an engineer reset. The call out charge by this company is far too cheap but it is clear they offset this by putting a markup on the batteries. By your own admission, you use the alarm whilst at home as well as when away meaning the alarm is in regular use which will deplete the batteries more quickly - typically even a good battery only gives about a year or reliable service. Seems clear to me that the engineer had to come out as the alarm required resetting (which he didn’t charge you for unless they include basic resets within the call out charge) and whilst there advised that batteries needed replacing which is plausible considering they were 21 months old with fairly heavy use. The batteries may all have been ‘low’ rather than dead taking away the ‘coincidence’ surrounding them failing at the same time as the power cut. Either way, the reason you called the engineer was because the alarm needed reset and at the very least I would be expecting the builder to pay the call out charge. The batteries however needed replaced and will need replaced annually to ensure reliability...

 

Probably eng reset on tamper

A cr123 from risco is going to cost a lot more than £2

Setting & unsetting a one way radio has no effect on sensor battery life

 

The sub wanted to recover the cost of the alarm repair from the electric co. or builder, the documentation from the alarm co. prevents this 


Mr:)

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