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Wireless Batteries


mountianrider

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2.8/2.7 is the threshold of low battery.

if 2.8 i doubt they wouldlast until next rmv.

2 years for now, although most vis devices will get 3 oor near to 3 years,, not worth the ballache, swap at 2.

I really can't be ar**** with it anymore.

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The problem is a litium cell will loose approx 0.5 - 2% of its capacity a year depending on brand. Couple this with the low power draw of wireless devices the curve just drops of completely very quickly.

The difficulty for the manufacturers is at what point do thy report a low battery. Too early and it looks like its running out of batteries, too late and the low battery running time is either very short of non existant.

 

The low voltage volts will depend on the manufacturer and cannot imo be the same for all manufactures.

 

I suppose the answer is to have it programmable so the maintainer can choose when it goes into low battery and how long it will function for in tht state before the supervision failure

 

post-6868-0-99148200-1443447696_thumb.jp

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The problem is a litium cell will loose approx 0.5 - 2% of its capacity a year depending on brand. Couple this with the low power draw of wireless devices the curve just drops of completely very quickly.

The difficulty for the manufacturers is at what point do thy report a low battery. Too early and it looks like its running out of batteries, too late and the low battery running time is either very short of non existant.

 

The low voltage volts will depend on the manufacturer and cannot imo be the same for all manufactures.

 

I suppose the answer is to have it programmable so the maintainer can choose when it goes into low battery and how long it will function for in tht state before the supervision failure

 

attachicon.gifcr123.jpg

 

Where did you get the data/graph from JW, is it something I can repost elsewhere?

Originally said by Charles Babbage
On two occasions I have been asked [by members of Parliament], 'Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out?' I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question.

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surely the other issue is what do the units need power wise to function as that may well vary from equipment manufacturer.

 

then given that the performance of the batteries varies significant based on the power they are drawing, so how much power does the wirless units draw, then you could get a better idea of which battery to opt for, but lower draws would suggest duracell or panasonic.

 

the right battery would be based on how it handles the demand from the device it is in, duracell seems consistantly good on all these test curves?

Edited by secureiam
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There isn't an ideal way.

Loading a battery and Volt testing will show accurately but doing that on a primary cell will affect it's life so all you can really do I Volt test. But I don't know that much about batteries in the level required

securitywarehouse https://store.securitywarehouse.co.uk

Trade Members please contact us for your TSI vetted trade discount.

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How would you best test a PIR battery then? 

 

We dont, for the reasons above, we replace lithiums acording to our procedures and without testing

Originally said by Charles Babbage
On two occasions I have been asked [by members of Parliament], 'Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out?' I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question.

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I have found batteries of all types, descriptions and manufacturers to be like lamps they can last a long time or a short time and with wireless stuff when monitored gives an advanced warning. Even then when the sun comes out what appeared to be a failing battery has been recovered by the system until the next cold spell. What we tend to do is use the ones we find to be best as the above chart indicates and of course the use and therefore drainage of the battery will dictate to a great degree how long they will last. E.g. on the wireless sounders from Texecom I saw the note about the life of the batteries can be between 2 years or 4 or 5 years depending if you enable the "comfort" led's or not. If you do continuous bell testing this too will reduce the life of them.

 

My biggest gripe about radio/wireless stuff is battery life. I see it as the weakest link in the security of the system even if the system proves to be great when working properly.

Practice in the morning, practice at night. Practice in the evening, until you get it right.

Only make sure you are practising in the right way at the right time for it.

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Yep, I had the old 'recovering battery' problem on one where service had been refused the previous year, and in failing it gave several 'low battery' reports.

 

My theory is that the frame was quite thin, and right in the sun on the reverse, so it kept heating up on warm days and the voltage went high then low again.

So, I've decided to take my work back underground.... to stop it falling into the wrong hands

 

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Yeah! batteries are a "specialist" subject on their own and of course good old ohm's law ends with "provided the temperature remains constant" (which it doesn't). :)

 

The other situation comes into being too when you have a detector covering a high traffic area and comparing the life of it to the life of one stuffed (technical term) in a store room that is hardly ever entered.

Practice in the morning, practice at night. Practice in the evening, until you get it right.

Only make sure you are practising in the right way at the right time for it.

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